[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

Judge Orders Man Who Violated Recording Ban To Publish An Essay About Respecting The Court AND To Delete All Negative Comments From Readers

Setting the Stage for an Amash Presidential Run, the Libertarian Party Endorses Trump’s Impeachment

Dems Vow To Learn From Labour Party's Mistake Of Not Going Far Enough Left

Hillary Milhous Felon's failed facelift

Cop Shoots Innocent Unarmed Woman, Forces Her to Crawl to Him as She Bleeds Out

"Richard Jewell" Shows What a Conservative Hollywood Would Look Like

They Couldn’t Have Done It Without Lapdogs Like the Washington Post

Sin Taxes & Other Orwellian Methods of Compliance That Feed the Government’s Greed

VA Democrats threaten prosecution and National Guard for police who fail to enforce pending gun control legislation

McConnell: ‘There Won’t Be any Difference’ on Handling Impeachment Trial Between Senate and W.H.

‘Celebrate Boris!’ – Trump Hails UK Election Result, ‘Massive New Trade Deal After Brexit’

UK Election: Exit Poll Suggests Historic Tory Majority, Hard-Left Labour Collapse

Secret Service Wants Schools to Report More Weirdos

Petition for the Recall of Governor Ralph Northam

'I Am Being Held Hostage By The Squad And Am Impeaching Trump Against My Will,' Nancy Pelosi Frantically Blinks Out In Morse Code

House Dems Unveil Surefire Plan To Get Trump Reelected

H.Res.757 - Calling for the resignation and disbarment of United States Attorney General William P. Barr, and for other purposes.

'The law is the law': Virginia Democrats float prosecution and National Guard for police who fail to enforce gun control legislation

Five thousand inventions in limbo and under “secrecy orders” at the US Patent Office

Cops Break Into Innocent Sleeping Woman’s Home, Shoot Her—Now She Faces Life in Prison

How unconscious do you want your child to be?

Trump's Popularity Surges After Nation Learns He May Have Obstructed Congress

Report: Jesus, Mary, Joseph Were Actually Detained Under Obama Administration

Hershey brew pub cancels GOP candidate's event with Proud Boys chair

Rudy G. - Godfather of the Russian Mob?

Number of African Migrants Heading to U.S. Through Mexico Doubles

Early Christian Philosophy and Aristotle

The Marine Who Told a Joke

Historic Achievement: Labor Union Backs Trump USMCA Trade Agreement

Joe Biden Pledges to Not Comply with Senate Subpoena in Impeachment Trial

Report: Senate GOP leaders leaning towards voting to acquit Trump before he has a chance to call any witnesses

Hoo boy: Some moderate Dems now pushing censure instead of impeachment

Hillary Clinton emerges as top choice of Democratic voters in Harvard-Harris presidential poll

California Cop Confuses Umbrella for Gun and Opens Fire with AR-15

More sober drivers are being arrested for DUI in Phoenix

“He Didn’t Just Die, Did He?”

No One is Immune to Police Misconduct…Including Retired Police!

Since Feeding the Homeless Is Illegal, Activists Carry AR-15s to Give Out Food, Supplies

Virginia Sheriff: ‘I Will Deputize Thousands of Citizens To Protect Their Gun Rights’

Pope Francis Declares That Christian Fundamentalists Are “A Scourge”

U.S. officials misled public on Afghan war

Democrats to announce articles of impeachment against Trump on Tuesday

How Trump May Finally Kill the WTO

Impeachment Gets Weird

OAN Stunning Lutsenko Interview – Outlines: Marie Yovanovitch Perjury, George Kent Impeachment Motive, Lindsey Graham Motive to Bury Investigation…

Hillary Clinton emerges as top choice of Democratic voters in Harvard-Harris presidential poll

BREAKING: US Attorney John Durham Releases Statement Disputing IG Report Conclusions

Judiciary Hearing Devolves As Democrats Reuse Their Witness To Question Other Witnesses

BREAKING: DOJ IG Report on FISA Applications is Finally Released — AG Bill Barr BLASTS FBI: “Launched Intrusive Investigation of US Presidential Campaign”

In Plain View: Jaw-Dropping Video of LSD Promoters Holding 1979 Meeting


Status: Not Logged In; Sign In

Bang / Guns
See other Bang / Guns Articles

Title: The Founding Father Who Told Americans We Have A Right To Military Weapons
Source: Daily Caller
URL Source: https://dailycaller.com/2019/04/15/natelson-military-weapons
Published: Oct 20, 2019
Author: Robert Natelson
Post Date: 2019-10-20 15:26:27 by Hondo68
Ping List: *Bang List*     Subscribe to *Bang List*
Keywords: Neighborhood Nuclear Superioty, NOW!, Tench Coxe
Views: 131
Comments: 11

NATELSON: The Founding Father Who Told Americans We Have A Right To Military Weapons

(KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

Does the Constitution’s right to keep and bear arms apply to everyone? Or only to law enforcement and the National Guard? Does the right include so-called “assault weapons?”

A newly published document from America’s founding offers a clue.

When interpreting the Constitution, judges and scholars consider what people said about the document around the time it was adopted. Writings by the Constitution’s advocates explaining its meaning to the general public are particularly helpful, because Americans relied on those explanations in deciding to ratify the document.

The most famous writings of this kind were penned by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay and collected as “The Federalist.” But there were many others. Among the most important were newspaper op-eds produced by Tench Coxe.

Few people know of Coxe today, but during the founding era he was famous. He served in the Confederation Congress. After the Constitution was ratified he became our first assistant secretary of the treasury, working directly under Alexander Hamilton.

Public release of the proposed Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787 ignited a massive public debate. Opponents argued that if the instrument were ratified it would create an all-powerful central government. Coxe supported the Constitution — and like Hamilton, Madison, and Jay, he was frustrated by opponents’ misrepresentations.

Coxe wrote a series of op-eds to accurately explain the Constitution’s legal effect. His informal style was much easier to understand than the scholarly tone of The Federalist, and his articles became extremely popular.

Many of Coxe’s op-eds were republished long ago, but new ones sometimes surface. The editors of the Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution recently issued new volumes that include four productions by Coxe previously known to only a few dedicated scholars.

In a Pennsylvania Gazette article published February 20, 1788, Coxe addressed the right to keep and bear arms: “The power of the sword, [opponents] say … is in the hands of Congress. My friends and countrymen, it is not so, for THE POWERS OF THE SWORD ARE IN THE HANDS OF THE YEOMANRY OF AMERICA FROM SIXTEEN TO SIXTY … Who are the militia? are they not ourselves[?].”

Coxe added, “The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people.”

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('dailycaller_inline3'); });

In other words, all able-bodied adult men have the right to keep and bear arms — not just law enforcement and the military. (Since ratification of the 14th Amendment, women also possess the right.)

Coxe also addressed the kinds of arms included: “Their swords, and every other terrible implement of the soldier, are the birth-right of an American.” In other words, the right to keep and bear includes military arms, not just hunting pieces. Rifles such as the AR-15 (misleadingly branded “assault weapons”) are protected — not despite the fact that they are military weapons, but precisely because they are military weapons!

Coxe’s view is hardly surprising to those of us who study the founders: The Revolutionary War had ended only five years before. If American citizens had not possessed military-style weapons, we would have lost.

Coxe wrote further, “Congress have no power to disarm the militia. What clause in the state or federal constitution hath given away that important right[?]”

This passage was composed well before the Second Amendment was proposed. Even then, Congress had no power to disarm the people. This was part of Coxe’s wider argument that federal powers were strictly limited. In other op-eds, Coxe listed many other matters outside the federal sphere and reserved exclusively to the states: education, social services, agriculture, most business regulation, and others.

Despite the fact that Americans relied on such representations when ratifying the Constitution, the federal government now asserts almost unlimited authority. Since politicians always seek to expand their power, that is understandable. Unfortunately, writers on the Constitution often pervert history and constitutional meaning to provide “cover” to the politicians. An example is the ludicrous claim — promoted by some leading law professors — that the Constitution’s Commerce Clause granted Congress vast power over our national life.

Tench Coxe’s writings provide a useful corrective. They are valuable reading for anyone who wants to understand what the Constitution actually says.


Poster Comment:

Have you hugged your nukes today? (1 image)

Subscribe to *Bang List*

Post Comment   Private Reply   Ignore Thread  


TopPage UpFull ThreadPage DownBottom/Latest

Begin Trace Mode for Comment # 5.

#2. To: All (#0)

When interpreting the Constitution, judges and scholars consider what people said about the document around the time it was adopted. Writings by the Constitution’s advocates explaining its meaning to the general public are particularly helpful, because Americans relied on those explanations in deciding to ratify the document.

District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 US 570, 576-77 (2008)

II

We turn first to the meaning of the Second Amendment.

A

The Second Amendment provides: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” In interpreting this text, we are guided by the principle that “[t]he Constitution was written to be understood by the voters; its words and phrases were used in their normal and ordinary as distinguished from technical meaning.” United States v. Sprague, 282 U. S. 716, 731 (1931); see also Gibbons v. Ogden, 9 Wheat. 1, 188 (1824). Normal meaning may of course include an idiomatic meaning, but it excludes secret or technical meanings that would not have been known to ordinary citizens in the founding generation.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Aldridge v. Williams, 44 U.S. 9, 24 (1845)

In expounding this law, the judgment of the Court cannot in any degree be influenced by the construction placed upon it by individual members of Congress in the debate which took place on its passage nor by the motives or reasons assigned by them for supporting or opposing amendments that were offered. The law as it passed is the will of the majority of both houses, and the only mode in which that will is spoken is in the act itself, and we must gather their intention from the language there used, comparing it, when any ambiguity exists, with the laws upon the same subject and looking, if necessary, to the public history of the times in which it was passed.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

United States v Union Pacific Railroad Company, 91 U.S. 72 (1875)

In construing an act of Congress, we are not at liberty to recur to the views of individual members in debate nor to consider the motives which influenced them to vote for or against its passage. The act itself speaks the will of Congress, and this is to be ascertained from the language used. But courts, in construing a statute, may with propriety recur to the history of the times when it was passed, and this is frequently necessary in order to ascertain the reason as well as the meaning of particular provisions in it. Aldridge v. Williams, 3 How. 24; Preston v. Browder, 1 Wheat. 115, 120 [argument of counsel -- omitted].

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Downes v. Bidwell, 182 U.S. 244, 254 (1901)

In expounding this law, the judgment of the Court cannot in any degree be influenced by the construction placed upon it by individual members of Congress in the debate which took place on its passage nor by the motives or reasons assigned by them for supporting or opposing amendments that were offered. The law as it passed is the will of the majority of both houses, and the only mode in which that will is spoken is in the act itself, and we must gather their intention from the language there used, comparing it, when any ambiguity exists, with the laws upon the same subject and looking, if necessary, to the public history of the times in which it was passed.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Ex Parte Grossman, 267 U.S. 86, 108-09 (1925)

The language of the Constitution cannot be interpreted safely except by reference to the common law and to British institutions as they were when the instrument was framed and adopted. The statesmen and lawyers of the Convention who submitted it to the ratification of the Conventions of. the thirteen States, were born and brought up in the atmosphere of the common law, and thought and spoke in its vocabulary. They were familiar with other forms of government, recent and ancient, and indicated in their discussions earnest study and consideration of many of them, but when they came to put their conclusions into the form of fundamental law in a compact draft, they expressed them in terms of the common law, confident that they could be shortly and easily understood.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

nolu chan  posted on  2019-10-21   12:32:32 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#3. To: nolu chan (#2)

The Founding Father Who Told Americans We Have A Right To Military Weapons

Tench Coxe was not a Founding Father.

misterwhite  posted on  2019-10-21   12:52:15 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


#5. To: misterwhite (#3)

The Founding Father Who Told Americans We Have A Right To Military Weapons

That's the title of the article. I did not post the article.

Tench Coxe was not a Founding Father.

I did not say anything about Tench Coxe. However, you are correct, Tench Coxe was not a Founding Father. He was a contemporary of the Framers.

He was Secretary of the Annapolis Convention (1786) and a delegate to the Continental Congress (1787-88).

I did post excerpts from five U.S. Supreme Court opinions showing that the Constitution and statutes are interpreted by the ordinary meaning of the plain text at the time written.

nolu chan  posted on  2019-10-21   14:10:43 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


Replies to Comment # 5.

#8. To: nolu chan (#5)

Sorry. That post was meant for Hondo68.

misterwhite  posted on  2019-10-21 15:02:15 ET  Reply   Untrace   Trace   Private Reply  


End Trace Mode for Comment # 5.

TopPage UpFull ThreadPage DownBottom/Latest

[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

Please report web page problems, questions and comments to webmaster@libertysflame.com