[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

911- Flight 175 Was Not A Commercial Aircraft

Wall Street Journal writer Joseph Rago found dead in his apartment (34 years old)

WATCH: Cop Kills Unarmed Man for Walking Toward Him – Gets Job Back & Immunity

Veterans Turn To Marijuana To Ditch ‘Cocktail Of Drugs’ From The VA

Professor Rages "My University Treated Me Like A Criminal Over A Joke"

Did Elon Musk just confirm that the moon landings were faked?

New Hampshire Decriminalizes Simple Marijuana Possession, Foundation to Nullify Federal Prohibition

Anthony Scaramucci Expected to Be Named White House Communications Director

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer Resigns After Trump Shakeup

First of Its Kind ‘Food Sovereignty’ Law Just Legalized Local Food Trade WITHOUT Govt

“I’ve Done A Bad Thing” 5-year-old Girl Bursts into Tears As Cops Fine Her for Lemonade Stand

Police Devise New Revenue Scam by Citing People Who Forget to Press Crosswalk Button

Billionaire GOP donor calls President Trump 'an abortion of a human being'

Here’s Who Will Lament — and Celebrate — the Plummeting U.S. Birth Rate

In Landmark Move, GOP Congress Calls Climate Change ‘Direct Threat’ to Security

John McCain Is a National Treasure

Second Monumental Arch of Titus

‘Oh, he just died’: Teens mock drowning man in disturbing video

Body Camera Video In Minneapolis Dog Shooting Released

The good people that Vic talks about needing welfare

Michigan Man Told To “Give Up Some Of Your Constitutional Rights” In Exchange For Adopting Grandson

Court Rules That Employees Can’t Be Fired For Medical Marijuana

Court Says Gov't Has To Do More Than Say It Doesn't Believe The Property Owners If It Wants To Keep The Cash It Seized

Megyn Kelly’s Bad News Just Keeps On Coming. She’s Screwed.

US Lawmakers Seek to Throw Citizens in Prison for Decades if They Boycott Israel

Police Claim Damond ‘Ambushed’ Cops-Unarmed in Pajamas-Family Blasts it as ‘Disinformation’

DUI-E Law Now Makes It Illegal to Text, Smoke and Even Eat While Driving

Taking Care of a Friend’s Dog For The Weekend? Better Have a License, NYC Says

DOJ Boss Promises The Return Of Everything That Didn't Work During The Last 40 Years Of Drug Warring

Orthodox Patriarch of Moscow - West is making a mistake

Breaking: O.J. Simpson granted parole

Antifa Leader Arrested in California for June 2016 Sacramento Riot

Bad Leadership 101: Toronto Man Builds Stairway for $550 Instead of $65,000 -- and the City Blocks It

This Poconos Property Manager Helped My Family Keep Our Vacation Home—Until Pennsylvania Shut Her Down

Jeff Sessions Marijuana Obsession vs Trump’s Pledge

Storage Cubby “Criminals”

John McCain diagnosed with Brain Cancer

Big Military Spending Boost Threatens Our Economy and Security

Girl at lemonade stand threatened by a man who said he'd call police for lack of a business license (misterwhite or Gatlin?)

Former Speaker of the House Let Out of Prison Early After Raping Children

Innocent Man Freed After Cop Seen on Own Body Cam Planting Drugs to Frame Him

Jilted Dentist Calls CPS on Mom

Why Did the IRS Seize this Wedding Boutique and Sell Everything for Next to Nothing?

His parents said he just needed to sleep. A SWAT team came instead

Called IT! (Minneapolis Cop "feared for his life") Officer heard ‘loud sound’ before partner shot Minneapolis woman

Trump threatens to change the course of American Christianity

Haiti Official Who Exposed The Clinton Foundation Is Found Dead

The Newest Cringeworthy Trend On Social Media: MAGA Swimwear

Trump says time to ‘let ObamaCare fail’ after health bill stalls

Recent high school grad accused of multiple robberies


Status: Not Logged In; Sign In

United States News
See other United States News Articles

Title: Where Radar Cameras Fear To Tread
Source: Reason
URL Source: https://reason.com/archives/2017/04/19/where-radar-cameras-fear
Published: Apr 20, 2017
Author: J.D. Tuccille
Post Date: 2017-04-20 06:03:47 by Deckard
Keywords: None
Views: 103
Comments: 1

Arizonans aren't big fans of being nagged about the weight of their feet on their accelerators.

A few years ago, county officials set up a mobile radar speed sign along the road to my old house. It looked lonely out there amid the tumbleweeds with only coyotes and rattlesnakes for company. Sure enough, within a day, I was treated to the sight of sheriff's deputies and county workers clustered sadly around the device, which had—apparently in despair over its isolated condition—leapt head-first into an arroyo.

State residents were also unhappy when speed cameras sprouted along the roads with ticket books attached. In 2008, Arizona officials signed a deal with Redflex, an Australian photo-enforcement company, to pioneer the first statewide system for robotically extracting money from people's wallets—oh, and "to modify driver behavior and make our roads safer," as Redflex creepily puts it. It wasn't particularly plausible that officials were chasing people down for their own good, but the appearance in the state budget of a line item for revenue from "Highway Photo Radar" was a bit of a giveaway about the real motivations for the contract.

Pasting Post-It notes over lenses of the Aussie speedcams was one tame but effective response. So was dressing up in Santa suits and dropping gaily decorated gift boxes over the machines. Silly String and spray paint worked just fine for obscuring the cameras' views, though smashing the spying little snitchbots with pickaxes had a more permanent effect.

One particularly creative scofflaw took to driving around the Phoenix area wearing monkey and giraffe masks. As it turned out, Arizona law requires that tickets be connected to drivers, not just vehicles. Few wildlife photos appear in the Department of Motor Vehicles database, complicating the process of serving the "offending" motorist within the required 90 days. State officials responded with a surveillance operation to identify the dissident; this project almost certainly cost more than they finally extracted.

It is possible to push back too hard. One annoyed driver far overstepped the boundaries of good judgment when, in 2009, he shot up a manned photo enforcement van and killed the operator. But the most effective response turned out to be throwing the tickets the cameras generated into the garbage.

"Only 39 percent of those ticketed drivers (432,367 of 1,109,035) knuckled under and paid up," Car and Driver magazine reported in 2010. The people trying to link drivers to all of those fast-moving vehicles were a tad "overtaxed," The New York Times added. Britain's Telegraph observed that "a mere $37 million of the $127 million in fines and surcharges has been collected."

There goes that revenue line item.

If process servers felt overtaxed, so did Arizonans in general—in a more literal sense, since they were on the business end of the devices. Their resistance paid off. After Gov. Janet Napolitano left office in 2009, Gov. Jan Brewer pulled the plug on the radar camera scheme.

That was the statewide program. Peoria and Tempe soldiered on for a while, then dropped their programs in 2011. By 2013, Scottsdale was reduced to concealing cameras "in tan metal boxes that kind of resemble big trash cans," according to the Phoenix New Times. The alternative weekly was happy to publish the cameras' locations along with a convenient map.

Tucson voters banned traffic photo enforcement in 2015 by an impressive 2-1 majority. State legislators, thwarted several times by local lobbyists, passed a more limited ban in 2016. But Attorney General Mark Brnovich, who could apparently tell which way the wind of popular sentiment was blowing, followed up with a ruling that photo ticket operators contracted with local governments have to hold private investigator licenses. Which none of them had bothered getting until that point because, honestly, nobody had ever thought of that particular requirement before.

Scottsdale is among the few remaining communities in the state still using speed cameras. The city even allows process servers to tape citations to people's front doors—or claim to have done so—to satisfy the requirements for notice. But as of the beginning of 2017, ignoring that kind of "alternate service" can no longer result in a suspended driver's license.

Most state officials have obviously received the message. Arizona drivers don't want robots monitoring their behavior and sending them bills when they're trying to get from point to point across relatively empty counties larger than some East Coast states. We can work out our own driving etiquette, thank you, and at a lower cost to boot.

Post Comment   Private Reply   Ignore Thread  


TopPage UpFull ThreadPage DownBottom/Latest

#1. To: Deckard (#0)

I liked the kids in CA who found a type of transparent plastic sheeting with an adhesive side that put them over their license plates. It caused the cameras to read a blank plate.

The jackboot legislature quickly passed laws with heavy fines to punish anyone doing that.

Tooconservative  posted on  2017-04-20   10:29:16 ET  Reply   Trace   Private Reply  


TopPage UpFull ThreadPage DownBottom/Latest

[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

Please report web page problems, questions and comments to webmaster@libertysflame.com