[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

On Libertarian Arrogance

Exclusive — Discussion About GOP Replacement to Paul Ryan as Speaker of the House Intensifies in White House, Congress

Teen killed, 6 wounded in St. Louis shooting, police say

McCain: World 'cries out' for US and EU leadership

‘Hello, Bob’: President Trump called my cellphone to say that the health-care bill was dead

Atlanta family battling state over right to name daughter Allah

Public Fornication Leads to Police Altercation

The health-care fiasco was not inevitable

An Interesting Theory on Muslim Immigration

‘Move fast and break things’: Trump’s healthcare failure and the backlash ahead

THE HEALTH-CARE DEBACLE WAS A FAILURE OF CONSERVATISM

Trump tastes failure as U.S. House healthcare bill collapses

The Republicans Fold on Health Care

Republicans Land a Punch on Health Care, to Their Own Face

Infowars apologizes for 'Pizzagate' coverage

AFTMATT SEDENSKYEMATT SEDENSKYR HEALTH CARE BILL'S WITHDRAWAL, ELATION AND ANGER

CNN CouldnÂ’t Cut This Guest Off Fast Enough Before He Exposed How They Control The Narrative!

No age discrimination: Muslim ‘migrants’ rape elderly German women, 90 and 79

WATCH – Official Risks Her Life To EXPOSE What Obama’s Muslim ‘Sleeper Cells’ Are Planning

Fox's Stuart Varney: 'The Republican Party is a disgrace'

Freedom Caucus drives dagger into heart of young Trump presidency

How disastrous for Trump is healthcare collapse?

DONALD TRUMP, PAUL RYAN AND THE REPUBLICANS LOST ON OBAMACARE. WHAT NOW?

Rand Paul used tips from ‘the Art of the Deal’ to defeat Trump’s replacement bill

Paul replaces Cruz as GOP agitator

Libertarians are flexing their political muscle

Freedom Caucus Can Just Walk Away

Sorry Dems: The Freedom Caucus, not you, defeated the Republican healthcare bill

Collapse of Obamacare repeal plan puts Freedom Caucus in complicated spot

Freedom Caucus leader Mark Meadows: I promised full Obamacare repeal

President Trump's inauguration team wanted 'military tactical vehicles' in Pennsylvania Avenue parade

Welcome to London: We can say we’re not afraid, light candles and make hearts of our hands but the truth is that we can’t go on like this, says Katie Hopkins

Rand Paul takes victory lap on GOP health bill

Unbelievable: 4-Year-Old Gets Suspended for Bringing Empty .22 Casing to Preschool

Lawsuit: Police Destroyed Farm House To Capture Homeless Man Armed With An Ice Cream Bar

SWAT Raids Man’s Home over $100 in Pot, Shoot at Him 57 Times, Paralyze Him, Then Lie About It

House Republicans pull health care bill

PA School District To Teenage Boy: Undress In Front Of Girls And Make It 'Natural'

Photos Of Malia Obama Heading Into Work Go Viral (Photos

Chelsea Clinton's chief of staff whines: 'Just like her mother Chelsea Clinton never gets a break

Report: White House hoping the health-care bill tanks today [Update: Set to blame Ryan?]

VIDEO: U.S. Navy Tests 'Star Wars' Electromagnetic Rail Gun That Can Destroy Targets up to 125 Miles Away

Cowards – and bast*rds: Networks censor rape of 14-year-old girl in Maryland by an illegal alien

NATO General Wants Answers to Chemtrails

Court Rules in Favor of Police Who Pounded on Wrong Door, Didn’t Identify Themselves, Then Killed Innocent Man for Holding a Gun

U.S. Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch: ‘A Fetus Is Not a Person’ Under the Law

Police: Hempstead man sexually abused child, stabbed 2 women

Potential 'smoking gun' showing Obama administration spied on Trump team, source says

Dem Rep Maxine Waters to Trump: ‘Get Ready for Impeachment’

BREAKING : Whistleblower BLOWING THE LID OFF Obama’s Corrupt Intelligence Network


Status: Not Logged In; Sign In

Mexican Invasion
See other Mexican Invasion Articles

Title: Supreme Court signals support for Arizona immigration law provision
Source: fox news
URL Source: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/201 ... ttle-arrives-at-supreme-court/
Published: Apr 25, 2012
Author: staff
Post Date: 2012-04-25 12:56:07 by calcon
Keywords: None
Views: 345

The Supreme Court signaled Wednesday that it might uphold a key element of Arizona's immigration law, as justices across the board suggested the state has a serious problem on its hands and should have some level of sovereignty to address illegal immigration.

The justices appeared to ready to allow a provision requiring police officers to check the immigration status of people they think are in the U.S. illegally.

The justices strongly suggested Wednesday they are not buying the Obama administration's argument that the state exceeded its authority, with Chief Justice John Roberts at one point saying he doesn't think the federal government even wants to know how many illegal immigrants are in the country.

"You can see it's not selling very well," Justice Sonia Sotomayor told Obama administration Solicitor General Donald Verrilli.

Just like the health care overhaul challenge heard earlier this month, Wednesday's hearing on the immigration law drew passionate surrogates from both sides. Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer was loudly booed by the law's opponents in front of the courthouse. She said in a statement Wednesday afternoon that "I am filled with optimism -- the kind that comes with knowing that Arizona's cause is just and its course is true."

While the justices addressed the traffic stop provision Wednesday, it was unclear what the court would do with other aspects of the law that have been put on hold by lower federal courts.

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who helped draft the law, voiced optimism in Arizona's chances.

"This was a very good day for Arizona in the Supreme Court today," he told Fox News. "The U.S. Justice Department was on the ropes."

But Brent Wilkes, director for the League of United Latin American Citizens, warned that the law would take a "human toll" on Arizona families if allowed to stand.

"This is really a racial profiling bill," he told Fox News.

The hearing Wednesday morning has implications far beyond Arizona's borders, as several states, including Alabama and South Carolina, have followed in Arizona's footsteps to craft their own immigration enforcement measures.

The Obama administration, which opposes those measures, has argued that the country cannot sustain a patchwork of separate immigration laws.

Verrilli, who is arguing on behalf of the government, said in his brief that the Executive Branch has the power to enforce immigration policy.

"For each state, and each locality, to set its own immigration policy in that fashion would wholly subvert Congress' goal: a single, national approach," he wrote.

But Arizona argued that the current system is broken, and that the state is paying an unfair price for that failure.

"Arizona shoulders a disproportionate burden of the national problem of illegal immigration," attorney Paul Clement argued in his brief. He argued that enforcement attention in California and Texas has turned the Arizona border into a funnel for illegal immigrants, with a third of illegal border crossings occurring there.

The attorney described Arizona's law as a response to an "emergency situation" -- with illegal immigrants soaking up millions of state dollars in health care and education, posing safety risks to ranchers and cutting into the state's job market.

Two of the key statutes, which have been blocked and will be at issue in Wednesday's arguments, are provisions to bar illegal immigrants from seeking a job and to require law enforcement to check the immigration status of anyone they suspect of being in the country illegally in the course of a routine stop.

A ruling from the Supreme Court is likely to come this summer, in the thick of the presidential election year -- it could either bolster what has been a bold move from the Obama administration's Justice Department to intervene in state issues ranging from immigration to voter ID laws, or stop the administration in its tracks and open the floodgates to even more state laws that challenge federal authority.

The immigration case arrives at the high court Wednesday just weeks after the justices heard arguments in the multi-state challenge to the federal health care overhaul.

Democrats on Capitol Hill this week were already scrambling to prepare for the possibility that the high court upholds the immigration law. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., announced a plan to introduce a bill that would effectively nullify Arizona's law -- though it would stand virtually no chance of passing in the Republican-controlled House.

"Immigration has not and never has been an area where states are able to exercise independent authority," Schumer said Tuesday at a Capitol Hill hearing, where he announced he would introduce the proposal should the Supreme Court "ignore" the "plain and unambiguous statements of congressional intent" and uphold the Arizona law.

But former Arizona state Sen. Russell Pearce, the author of the law, said: "We have a national crisis, and yet everyone wants to ignore that: the cost, the damage, the crime."

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/...reme-court/#ixzz1t4X4lq00

Post Comment   Private Reply   Ignore Thread  


[Home]  [Headlines]  [Latest Articles]  [Latest Comments]  [Post]  [Mail]  [Sign-in]  [Setup]  [Help]  [Register] 

Please report web page problems, questions and comments to webmaster@libertysflame.com